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The Origin of Plants

Plant History

The Origin of Plants

THE ORIGIN of PLANTS is a seminal work regarding the thousands of plants that have been introduced into Britain over the past 1000 years and the dramatic effect they have had on our landscape and gardens.  
 
A thousand years ago there were only a few hundred indigenous plants and most of the lovely flowers and trees we take for granted were as yet unknown in the British Isles. Over the past millennium, seeds, bulbs, seedlings and cuttings have been brought home - deliberately or unwittingly - by travellers, warriors, explorers and plant hunters who introduced what we now consider everyday plants, such as the rhododendron from the Far East, gladiolus from Africa and exotics like the monkey puzzle tree from Chile.  
 
The respected garden historian Maggie Campbell-Culver has researched the provenance and often strange histories of many of these thousands of plants which add colour and beauty to our gardens today. No crocus brightened the spring before the Middle-Ages, no horse chestnut grew in our woods until the first one was brought from the Balkans in the seventeenth century and no wisteria festooned our walls until 1816 when one was sent from China.  
 
THE ORIGIN of PLANTS reveals the species that arrived century by century and the fascinating stories of the people behind them. Europe and the Near East, Russia and North America, South America and South Africa, India, the Antipodes and finally Japan and China all yielded a dazzling bounty that has enriched Britain's flora immeasurably and explains why our gardens and parks are now so spectacular. With an introduction by Sir Tim Smit KBE this richly illustrated with contemporary paintings and modern photographs, this is an authoritative and beautiful record of our botanical heritage.  
 
THE ORIGIN of PLANTS was published after five years research and is a chronology of the plants introduced to British gardens. It tells the fascinating story of how and why Britain’s gardens both public and private are home to the widest range of plants of any nation on earth. The book was short-listed for a ‘Guild of Garden Writers Award’, now the 'Garden Media Guild' (GMG), and is recommended reading for people enrolling in gardening courses. 

The Origin of Plants
origin of plants, plant names, plant introductions, trees, tree planting, English gardens, origin of British plants, plant world, Mount Edgcumbe,  horticulture, john evelyn, charlemagne, gardening history, british flora The Eden Project, Garden Media Guild
Tim Smit
Available from all good bookshops, Amazon and other online book sellers. 
Also available from Amazon as Ebooks for Kindle and other E readers. 
Deep Cove Garden Club, Vancouver, Canada
Aster novi-belgii
“is the plant with the strongest genes and has been the one most used in breeding our present-day Michaelmas Daisies. When grown well and looking happy they add star quality to the late summer herbaceous border, but they are not as steadfast as some would like. They are vulnerable to attack by anything that moves or munches in the soil – snails, slugs …as well as Fusarium wilt, leaf spot, powdery mildew and grey mould and if that isn’t enough, many of the taller varieties require staking.” (p155 Maggie Campbell-Culver’s scholarly The Origin of Plants)
The Eden Project